Jonathan Cannon, PhD student in Screen Studies

cannon profile update shipman

Photo by Shay Shipman

Address: Morrill 401
Phone: 405-744-1880
E-mail: jonathan.cannon@okstate.edu

MA in Film Studies, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada 
BA in Film Studies, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Areas of Interest

  • Silent cinema
  • Star/celebrity studies
  • Hollywood
  • Archives and preservation studies
  • Visual rhetoric
  • Cult cinema
  • Popular cinema
  • Cultural studies
  • American studies

Exam Areas

  • Production & Industrial History
  • Film & Media Theory
  • Star & Celebrity Studies

 Courses Taught

  • ENGL 2453: Introduction to Film and Television

Publications

  • Book review of The Terministic Screen: Rhetorical Perspectives on Film (Ed. David Blakesley). KB Journal (The Journal of the Kenneth Burke Society) 11.2 (Spring 2016)
  • Editor-in-Chief, Cinephile (UBC Film Studies Journal), Vol. 7, Issue 1, "Reassessing Anime" (2011)
  • Editorial Board Member, Cinephile, Vol. 8, Issue 1, "The Voice-Over" (2012); Vol. 7, Issue 2, "Contemporary Realism" (2011/12); and Vol. 6, Issue 2, "Horror Ad Nauseam" (2010)

Conference Presentations

  • "Elvis Presley, Death, and the Graceland Cam." Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association. Baltimore, MD. Nov. 2018. (accepted)
  • "The Tom Mix Museum: Archiving Stardom in Small-Town Oklahoma." Society for Cinema and Media Studies. Toronto, Canada. Mar. 2018.
  • "The President William Howard Taft Monument at Arlington National Cemetery: (Re)visiting James Earle Fraser's Commemorative Stele." Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association. Indianapolis, IN. Mar. 2018. 
  • "Sitcom Celebrity." "What about TV acting?" Roundtable Speaker. Flow. Austin, Texas. Sept. 2016.
  • "Vegas Vision: The Las Vegas Strip and the Rhetorical 'Crisis' of Brightness." Western States Rhetoric and Literacy Conference. Reno, NV. Nov. 2014. (accepted)
  • "The Big Lebowski and the Intinerantetual Cult Film." PCA/ACA. Chicago, IL. Apr. 2014.
  • "Touristic Deathgazing: Dark Fan Tourism, Memorial Culture, and Mobile Posthumous Celebrity Worship." SCMS. Seattle, WA. Mar. 2014.
  • Rocky Horror Redux: Subcultural Liveness and The Performative Pilgrim.” Film Studies Association of Canada (FSAC) Graduate Student Colloquium. The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. Feb. 2012.

Professional Appointments

  • Research & Professional Development Liaison, OSU Writing Center (Spring 2017-present) (CFP and conference alerts archiving, CSM meeting reading preparation, APA formatting refresher)
  • Supervisor, OSU Writing Center West (Agriculture Hall), Fall 2016-Fall 2017
  • Film Director/Videographer, OSU Writing Center Promotional Videos for Website, Summer 2016
  • Consultant, OSU Writing Center, Fall 2013-present
  • Co-leader, "Feminism in the Writing Center" Inquiry Group, OSU Writing Center, Spring 2017
  • Co-leader, "Gender Studies" Inquiry Group, OSU Writing Center, Fall 2017
  • Leader, "(Inter)national Identity" Inquiry Group, OSU Writing Center, Spring 2018
  • Reader, The Library of Congress (Washington, D.C.), Sept. 2017-Sept. 2019

Awards and Recognition

  • Houston-Truax-Wentz Travel Award (Oct. 2017)
  • Oklahoma State University Graduate College Fellowship (Sept. 2013)
  • Golden Key Honor Society (Nov. 2011)

Professional Memberships

  • Domitor
  • The Society of Media and Cinema Studies
  • Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association

Current Research/Articles in Progress

1) Dissertation: “Ethnic Male Stardom and the Parvenu Paradigm of Early Hollywood, 1915-1925.”

Using a combination of archival research, racial/ethnic theory, and textual analysis, I aim to retell the history of how ethnic male stars such as Sessue Hayakawa, Rudolph Valentino, and Ramon Novarro became mass media parvenus instead of stars classically defined through the “white,” “American,” and highly homogenous star system of early Hollywood. In sum, The project reexamines the emergence and commercialization of the ethnic male star by way of a comparative approach to the cultural diversity of early Hollywood discourse.

2) Qualifying Paper in Visual Rhetoric: “Looking Back: Black Male Celebrity, Retro Style, and the New Cool Pose” (Defended Mar. 2018)

Having successfully defended and submitted the qualifying paper requirement for my secondary track in Composition & Rhetoric, with a focus on Visual Rhetoric this past March, I’m now in the process of seeking a suitable home for the document, either in a journal or possibly an anthology.

3) The Tom Mix Museum Project

I gave a talk in Toronto back in March on my experience and the findings yielded at the Tom Mix Museum in the small town of Dewey in Oklahoma. Star archives and small town museums continue to receive scant attention in the field of film studies, and I want to revisit my research on this topic and once again visit Dewey for more experiences, stories, and data.

4) The Colin Kaepernick Project

I’m still in the early stages of this project, tentatively titled “Colin Kaepernick’s Intersectional Pose.” Building off of my continued interest on poses and the act of posing in popular culture more broadly as well as displays of the cool pose more specifically, the aim of this project is to survey the visual rhetoric of football player-cum-activist Colin Kaepernick through modes of celebrity, displays in US material and visual culture, and the representation and circulation of his image rendered as a visual embodiment of intersectionality.

Why OSU?

OSU's program in screen studies champions interdisciplinary approaches to research on film, television, and new media. I am continually impressed by the excellent instruction, guidance, and expertise of the faculty.