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Upcoming Events

3Aug
8Aug
08/08/2018 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Summer 8wk session final grades due
20Aug
08/20/2018
Fall Classes Begin
 
 

Lindsey Claire Smith


SmithHeadShot

Interim Director, Center for Poets and Writers at OSU-Tulsa
Co-Chair, Tulsa Lit.Fest

Associate Professor
PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
BA, Hendrix College


 Areas of Interest & Expertise

  • American Indian Studies
  • Global Indigenous Studies

Recent Upper Division & Graduate Courses Taught

  • ENGL/AMST 4230: Water is Life: A Standing Rock Syllabus
  • ENGL 6250: Native American Literature and Gender
  • ENGL 4330: Reimagining the West
  • ENGL 3190: Pacific Indigenous Literatures
  • ENGL/AMST 3813: Indigenous Hawaii
  • ENGL 6250: Native American Literature and the Environment
  • ENGL 4310 American Modernism(s)
  • AMST 3813: Native American Oklahoma
  • AMST 3550: Native American Studies and the Arts
  • Teaching Urban Native American Literatures (University of Paderborn, Germany)

Current Research & Projects

"Creating Kin: Writing the Native City from Oklahoma." (under contract with U of NE P). 

Native American writers from Oklahoma are on the cutting edge of literature and film, advancing stories of life in urban, cosmopolitan environments to new readers and audiences across the world. And yet, so far studies of urban Indian literature have either insufficiently treated or completely overlooked Oklahoma writers. This project aims to correct that oversight. I argue that the writers and filmmakers of my study--LeAnne Howe, Joy Harjo, Sterlin Harjo, Jennifer Foerster, and Lynn Riggs--render cities as homelands, not as diasporic places, because of their ancestral origins in the Southeast U.S. These writers do not foreground the legacy of the Urban Relocation Program in their creative treatments of city life. While Relocation did have a tremendous impact on Native peoples of Oklahoma, especially those from tribes in the western part of the state, the writers in my study refer to the historical, ceremonial, and creative significance of cities that are related to their tribal cultures for reasons other than Relocation. Three cities, New Orleans, Tulsa, and Santa Fe, are case studies for this unique writing by Native Oklahomans, which connects urban homelands in Oklahoma and beyond and reveals the need for a new methodology of urban Indian studies.

Selected Publications

Books and Edited Volumes:

Editor, American Indian Quarterly

(with Paul Lai). Alternative Contact: Indigeneity, Globalism, and American Studies. Johns Hopkins UP, 2011.(co-edited essay collection; originally published as special issue of American Quarterly  62.3). Special Recognition, Constance M. Rourke Committee, American Studies Association, 2011.

Indians, Environment, and Identity on the Borders of American Literature. Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.  

Articles and Book Chapters:

"Tallasi Through the Lens: Locating Native Tulsa in the Films of Sterlin Harjo." Settler City Limits: Indigenous Resurgence and Colonial Violence in the Urban Prairie West. Ed. David Hugill and Tyler McCreary. University of Manitoba Press. Forthcoming.

(With Trever Holland). "'Beyond All Age': Indigenous Water Rights in Linda Hogan's Fiction." Studies in American Indian Literatures 28.2 (2016): 56-79.

"The 'Whole Foods' Paradox: Food Sovereignty, Eco-Iconography, and Urban Indigenous Discourse." Elohi: Indigenous Environments 1.2 (2013): 59-78.

"Indigenous Military Involvement in (De)Colonial Contexts." Critical Insights: War. Ed. Alex Vernon. Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, (2012): 256-74.

'With These Magic Weapons, Make a New World': Indigenous Centered Urbanism in Tomson Highway's Kiss of the Fur Queen." Canadian Journal of Native Studies 29.1&2 (2009): 143-164.

The New World and Apocalypto: Updates of Old Stereotypes for the New Millennia (Introduction)." With Judith Villa and Penelope Kelsey. Studies in the Humanities (special issue on American Indian Studies) 33.2 (2006): 128-39.

Cross-Cultural Hybridity in James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans." American Transcendental Quarterly 20.3 (2006): 527-52.

Transcending the 'Tragic Mulatto': The Intersection of Black and Indian Heritages in Contemporary Literature." Ethnic Studies Review 26.1 (2003): 45-66. 

Honors:

Community Engagement Award, College of Arts and Sciences, OSU, 2015

Junior Faculty Award, College of Arts and Sciences, OSU, 2012 

Recent Grants & Research Trips

  • Scholar Research Grant, Oklahoma Humanities Council, 2015
  • College of Arts and Sciences Research Leave, Spring 2015
  • College of Arts and Sciences FY12 ASR + 1 Award
  • College of Arts and Sciences Travel Award, 2007, 2009
  • Dean's Incentive Grant, 2007, 2008
  • Fae Rawdon Norris Endowment for the Humanities Grant, 2007
  • Newberry Library, Chicago IL, 2007
  • Sequoyah Fellowship for American Indian Studies, University of North
    Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2005-2006.

Recent Conference Presentations

"Of Keystone, DAPL, and Diamond: Teaching About Standing Rock in Oil--and Indian--Country." Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, May 2018

"Where it All Started: Jazz, History, and Futurity in the Writings of Joy Harjo." Native Crossroads Film Festival, Norman, OK, April 2018

"Reclaiming Glacier National Park in Mourning Dove's Cogewea (1927)." Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Vancouver, BC, June 2017

"'The City Different': Finding--and Resisting--Indigenous 'Authenticity' in the Joy Harjo's Santa Fe." Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, June 2015

"'The Jokes Are on Us And/Or You': Comedy and Community of the 1491s." Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Austin, TX, May 2014

"Indigeneity and Self-Help." Public lecture. University of Paderborn. Paderborn, Germany, December 2011

"The 'Whole Foods' Paradox: Food Sovereignty, Eco-Iconography, and Urban Indigenous Discourse," International conference on Indigenous Peoples and the Environment, Bordeaux, France, December 2011

"Indigeneity and the Production of Urban Space," Sequoyah Distinguished Lecture Series, American Indian Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, April 2011

"Theorizing Urban Indigeneity," Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Tuscon, AZ, May 2010

"Cosmopolitan Indigeneity: Los Angeles in Joy Harjo's Poetry and Kent Mackenzie's The Exiles," American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, November 2009

"Urban Oklahoma in Sterlin Harjo's Four Sheets to the Wind," Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN, May 2009

"Global Indigeneity in Greg Sarris's Watermelon Nights," American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Albuquerque, NM, October 2008

"The Indigenous Cityscape in Tomson Highway's Kiss of the Fur Queen," Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Athens, GA, April 2008

"American Indian Literature and the City of Chicago." Modern Language Association Annual Meeting, December 2007.

"Images of the City in the Works of Sherman Alexie." Western Literature Association Annual Meeting, Tacoma, WA, October 2007.

“Place and Prophecy in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead,” Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Norman, OK, May 2007.


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